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Selected Trips

Following the German experience of WWII

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This itinerary takes you to a number of German military cemeteries, museums and other remembrance places throughout Europe that capture the German experience of World War II.

In the footsteps of the Prinses Irene Brigade

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This itinerary follows in the footsteps of the Dutch Prinses Irene Brigade, which was formed from Dutch men who fled to England after the collapse of the Netherlands in May 1940.

Following the Canadian experience of WWII

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To follow in the footsteps of Canadian troops during WWII, you will depart from the UK where Canadians gathered with other Allied troops to take part in a series of trainings to prepare for D-Day.

Following the British experience of WWII

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The route of British troops at the end of the Second World War started in July 1943 with the invasion of Sicily and mainland Italy. Then they trained in the United Kingdom for the D-Day landings and the invasion of Normandy, together with other allied troops.

Following the Polish experience of WWII

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The European theatre of WWII opened with the German invasion of Poland in 1939, followed by the Soviet invasion. Throughout the war, Poles provided significant contributions to the Allied effort, fighting on land, sea and air. Large number of Polish troops managed to escape, first to France, then to the United Kingdom, where they formed the 1st Armoured Division and the 1st Parachute Brigade.

In the footsteps of the Piron Brigade

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The Belgian 1st Infantry Brigade was formed in early 1943 in England by the Belgian Prime Minister in exile. It reunited the various Belgian units dispersed within the British Army: survivors from 1940, volunteers from the colonies and Legionnaires from North Africa. In command of the Brigade was Jean-Baptiste Piron, a veteran of World War I and officer in the Belgian army in 1940.

In the footsteps of the Commando Kieffer

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The Commando Kieffer owes its name to a banker born in Haiti who, at the age of 40, decided to join the military. Philippe Kieffer was commander of the sole French unit present in Normandy on 6 June 1944.

General Harry Crerar & the First Canadian Army

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During WWII, General Harry Crerar commanded the First Canadian Army. In Normandy, the First Army was involved in Operation Totalize, Operation Tractable, the Battle of the Falaise Pocket, and the final clearing of the Channel Coast.

General James M. Gavin & the 82nd Airborne Division

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American General James M. Gavin was the youngest major general in the U.S. Army in World War II. He was also the only general to make four combat airborne jumps during the war.

General Maczek & the 1st Polish Armoured Division

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This itinerary crosses Normandy, France; Flanders, Belgium; the Netherlands; and Germany, taking you to some of the most significant milestones in Maczek’s journey during the war.

Maréchal Leclerc & the 2nd French Armoured Division

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The 2nd French Armoured Division landed in Normandy on 1 August 1944 and took part in the liberation of Paris before pursuing the German army towards the Alsace region.

In the footsteps of Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery

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During this week-long itinerary you will visit sites that recall Montgomery’s involvements in the different fronts and battles fought at the end of the war.

In the footsteps of General George S. Patton

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This tour takes you to the different locations General Patton crossed between July 1943, starting with the Sicily landings and ending with the liberation of the Czech Republic in May 1945.

Alsace

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Alsace houses a large number of historical places commemorating its rich history during the Second World War. The British, the French, the Americans first liberated the northern part of the region in November 1944.

Normandy

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By the evening of 6 June 1944, the Allied forces had established a foothold on all five landing beaches. There was still a long way to go, but the day’s operations, which took the German command by surprise, were successful.

Italy

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Italy and its natural and cultural richness can also be discovered through the sites and museums memorialising the Italian Campaign and the liberation of Italy: from Sicily via Montecassino to Rome.

Poland

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For the population of Poland, the end of the Second World War was not necessarily a liberation. The arrival of the Soviet Army meant first defeat and then effectively a new occupation. For many Poles the political consequences of the war lasted until 1989, when Poland became an independent and democratic state again.

Warsaw

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The bombing campaign of Warsaw by the German Luftwaffe during the Invasion of Poland started on 1 September 1939 and resulted in gruelling years of terror, occupation, resistance and tragedy. Visit Poland and pay tribute to the heroes and victims of this city’s events during WWII.

Zeeland & North Brabant

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The Battle of the Scheldt occupies a prominent place in the collective memory of the local Zeeland population and beyond. It played a key role in the liberation of the Netherlands and the end of the Second World War.

Limburg

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WWII cost the lives of many civilians in Limburg, and a large number of towns and villages were destroyed by bombings and artillery battles. Various cemeteries, too, bear witness to this dark chapter in Limburg’s history.

Arnhem & Nijmegen

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To ensure the success of Operation Market Garden, the Allied forces had to capture the bridge in Arnhem. However, the light-armed airborne forces stood no chance against two SS Panzer divisions that happened to be in the area.

Berlin

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The Battle of Berlin was one of the last battles of the Second World War in Europe. The war that had been called for in Berlin finally returned to the city. Many soldiers and civilians died in widespread house-to-house fighting. On 21 April, the first Soviet units finally entered Berlin.

Luxembourg

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Today, visitors can explore the beautiful landscape of Luxembourg and visit the places where historical events are memorialised, such as General McAuliffe Monument, dedicated to the memory of General Anthony McAuliffe, Division Artillery Commander and Acting Division Commander of the 101st US Airborne.

Belgium and the Battle of the Bulge

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The Battle of the Bulge was a major German offensive campaign launched through the densely forested Ardennes region of Wallonia in Belgium, France, and Luxembourg on the Western Front toward the end of WWII.

Paris

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The liberation of Paris was not a priority for the Allies, but an uprising of the population against the Germans on 19 August made it necessary.

London

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London played an important role in nearly every aspect of the Second World War. The city was host to several governments in exile and was an important centre for the planning of the Allied war efforts.

Pilsen

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In May 1945 the US Third Army Division, led by General Patton, entered into Pilsen to liberate the Czech people from six years of German occupation.

Rome

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Rome was captured by the Allies after the fierce battles of Monte Cassino and Anzio were fought. Today different museums document the history of the city and highlight important events such as the resistance movement and the liberation in June 1944.

United Kingdom

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Explore the fascinating war in the skies known as the Battle of Britain. After the fall of France in 1940 and their own discouraging defeat in Belgium and France, the United Kingdom regrouped, dug in and took to the air